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The PA Profession

March 26, 2017

Filed under: event,life — Terry Wohlers @ 15:32

According to Yale School of Medicine, a physician assistant or associate (PA) is a state-licensed or federally-credentialed healthcare professional that practices medicine with physician supervision. Yale goes on to say that in clinical practice, PAs perform an extensive range of services in nearly every medical and surgical specialty and healthcare setting.

The profession has grown dramatically in the U.S. In fact, CNNMoney ranked it as the number one fastest-growing field, with a 49.7% job growth over a period of 10 years. Yet PAs are not well known outside the U.S. When speaking to friends and business associates in other countries, I find that most are not familiar with the profession. Even with such impressive growth, it is almost non-existent beyond U.S. and Canadian borders.

On Friday, our daughter, Heather, graduated from South University (Tampa, Florida) as a PA after a very intense program. We are very proud that she made it into the program and graduated. Only 24 out of 1,000+ applicants were accepted into the program. As part of the graduation ceremony, each of the graduates received a long white coat, a tradition that signifies completion of a PA program. While working as a student, they wore waist-length white coats, so receiving the longer version is very special.

All 24 students successfully completed the program and graduated on Friday, but all of them have one more very important step: to take the national exam. Those who pass it become a certified PA and can practice medicine. Those who do not can try again in three months.

While working at a medical clinic, doctor’s office, or hospital, a PA typically becomes increasingly autonomous. They see patients, prescribe medicine, and perform medical procedures such as suturing open wounds and surgically removing tissue. PAs do a large percentage of what a doctor does, but without the legal liability and sometimes odd and challenging hours. For many PAs, it can be more of an “8-5” job, although many work in urgent care, ER, or surgery where hours can be long and irregular.

We are incredibly proud of Heather, not only for completing the PA program, but also for going into a profession that truly helps others. Graduation ceremony keynote speaker Elliott Cazes, MD, said the most important instrument a medical professional can use is not a stethoscope or ophthalmoscope, but rather his or her ears. It is vitally important to carefully listen to a patient to fully understand their situation. Given what I’ve learned about the PA profession and Heather’s outlook on practicing medicine, she and her 23 fellow PAs will follow his advice and contribute a great deal to the field of medicine and the U.S. healthcare system.

Character and Integrity

March 12, 2017

Filed under: uncategorized — Terry Wohlers @ 09:35

Character and integrity define a person. People for which I have the most respect have a lot of both. They are true to their word and you can trust they will do what they say. A number of long-time friends and business associates fall into this category. As time passes, I value them more than ever. I do not always agree with their opinions, but my admiration for them remains strong.

We need to do our very best to set an example for others. We cannot waiver or give in to temptation when times become difficult. We need to do the right thing, even when no one is looking. Honesty and following through on promises and commitments are vital. People with good character and integrity gain the respect of others and are happier.

An Itch for Travel

February 26, 2017

Filed under: life,travel — Terry Wohlers @ 07:58

I like to travel and so does my wife and kids. Some of our best memories and times together are from family vacations. For years, we made a habit of spending several days in a tropical area with a nice beach for some serious relaxation and scuba diving. Life does not get much better than spending quality, uninterrupted time with the family.

Many opportunities for travel have developed in recent weeks, but I’ve declined most of them due to work-related projects and commitments that have kept me in the office. After being “chained down” for weeks, I have experienced an urge for travel. Some people don’t like it, especially frequent business travel, but I look forward to the trips. I especially like going to new places, both domestically and internationally. The adventure, coupled with meeting people and creating new friendships and business contacts, makes it interesting and gratifying.

I’m looking forward to another year filled with travel and new experiences. A number of trips have been planned and many others are being scheduled. Planning them gives me another reason to get excited about getting up in the morning.

3D Printing’s Place in History

February 12, 2017

Filed under: 3D printing,additive manufacturing,future — Terry Wohlers @ 06:39

Johannes Gutenberg invented the printing press in or around 1440. Since then, humans have experienced many life-changing technical advances such as electricity, medicine, radio, and the telephone. Henry Ford was credited with popularizing the automobile in the early 1900s. Later came air travel and the semiconductor, which led to computers, robotics, and the Internet.

A subject that I have pondered for some time is whether 3D printing will be viewed as a major technical advancement, similar to these other developments. We may not know for decades into the future, but many agree that it’s certainly headed in that direction.

Forecasting the Future

January 28, 2017

Filed under: 3D printing,additive manufacturing,future — Terry Wohlers @ 16:14

Looking ahead is tricky business. Many try, but most can’t do it well. Predicting what might occur in a year from now is one thing, but looking further out, such as years or longer, is difficult. Megatrends author John Naisbitt said, “The most reliable way to forecast the future is to understand the present.” That’s where we put the majority of our energy. We feel that if a company truly understands where things are today, they have a chance at creating a view of the future.

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With history and data points, one can extend trend lines to gain a sense for where something is headed. We have collected and analyzed hard data for more than 20 years for the Wohlers Report, and place a lot of weight on extending trend lines. This, alone, is not enough. We also need to do our best at understanding the present state of 3D printing and additive manufacturing. We adjust our views of the future based on a number of factors, including new developments such as GE’s recent investment of about $1.4 billion in additive manufacturing.

The bottom line: do not make business decisions based entirely on forecasts. Factor in views and opinions from people with a lot of experience and history in the subject of interest. It is easy for someone to make a forecast, even the inexperienced, but it’s incredibly difficult to do it accurately. Most people that read these forecasts do not look back to see if they were accurate, which is a mistake.

Snow

January 14, 2017

Filed under: life — Terry Wohlers @ 07:31

The Rocky Mountains of Colorado have received a staggering amount of snow over the past few weeks. In fact, it’s on pace for its best January snowfall in 100 years. What’s more, it could turn out to be the best month ever. With the snowpack currently at 150% for this time of year, the rivers, lakes, and reservoirs will be at their brim when it melts.

Copper Mountain, our favorite ski resort, yesterday reported 107 cm (42 inches) in the previous seven days. The upper mountain depth is 200 cm (79 inches). Wolf Creek, a ski resort near Pagosa Springs, Colorado, has a mid-mountain depth of a whopping 262 cm (103 inches). Ski resorts and mountain towns are running out of places to put all of the snow.

snowfall

All of the snow comes with consequences. A friend that made a day trip to Vail Mountain this week spent more time driving than skiing. In all, they were in the car nearly nine hours, when the roundtrip should not take more than about five hours.

Some of the same storms brought 51 cm (20 inches) of much needed rain to northern California, ending a horrible five-year drought. The Heavenly Ski Area near Lake Tahoe has received an unthinkable 366 cm (12 feet) of snow.

Overall, recent weeks have been kind to western regions of the U.S. The snow and rain have caused flooding, avalanches, road closures, and other problems, but that goes with the territory. We can only hope for a steady amount of moisture in the coming months.

Best Products of 2016

January 1, 2017

Filed under: review — Terry Wohlers @ 17:24

At this time nearly every year, I like to highlight some of the best products of the year. The following are those that stand out and deserve special recognition.

Jeep Grand Cherokee – We purchased the 2016 75th Anniversary Edition in May, which includes some special features, such as bronze wheels and trim. I like everything associated with this product, and it may be one of the best vehicles we have owned. It now has fewer than 6,435 km (4,000 miles) on it, so it’s probably too soon to draw a final conclusion. The safety features, adaptive cruise control, eight-speed transmission, and overall drivability and comfort make it a great product.

jeep

Logitech HD Pro Webcam C920 – I paid $63 for this excellent device. It rests nicely at the top of my monitor and shoots high-quality 1080p video for saving or use with Skype or other types of broadcasts.

CamelBak Rogue Hydration Pack – This is my first CamelBak product and I like it a lot. I bought it for mountain biking and it’s perfect for half-day trips. It’s a good value at $44.

Black+Decker LST300 Trimmer/Edger – For $63, this battery-powered product is excellent for edging your lawn along the driveway and sidewalk.

Graco Secure Coverage Digital Baby Monitor – If you want to know whether your child or grandchild is awake, it’s a bargain at just $35.

With the exception of the Jeep Grand Cherokee, we purchased all of these products from Amazon. The company’s Prime service is excellent.

Best wishes to you for a great 2017. Happy New Year!

3D Systems – Healthcare

December 16, 2016

Filed under: 3D printing,additive manufacturing — Terry Wohlers @ 17:21

I visited 3D Systems’ new healthcare facility in Denver, Colorado for the first time on Monday. The company invited a number of people from the media and investment community to see the facility and get an update on the company’s strategy. Vyomesh “VJ” Joshi, the relatively new CEO at 3D Systems, led much of the discussion, along with other senior managers. We toured the facility and got our hands on some of the medical simulation tools for endoscopic surgery, colonoscopies, and other procedures. The facility employs about 140 people, many of whom process data from medical scanners, such as CT and MRI, and prepare it for 3D printing.

VJ said the company’s new strategy is to focus on vertical markets, such as healthcare, aerospace, automotive, and others. The Denver healthcare site is, by far, the most developed of the verticals and serves as a great example. Andy Christensen, former owner and president of Medical Modeling, deserves much of the credit. 3D Systems acquired the company in April 2014. Andy and his management team were very much a part of the design of the new facility, which opened in March 2016. Christensen was employed by 3D Systems until March 2015 when he left the company. 3D Systems’ management said that it has planned 75,000 surgical cases, although most of them were done by Medical Modeling before it was acquired.

hearts

In my view, the healthcare facility is the “crown jewel” of the company’s verticals. Christensen knew what he was doing when growing Medical Modeling from 2000 to 2014. Likewise, I believe VJ knows what he’s doing in building on this success and using it as an example for other vertical markets. The focus is on specific application solutions for industrial sectors, rather than on the company’s products and services. This shift in focus, coupled with other adjustments VJ is making, is refreshing. He explained that if some of the 50 or so companies and businesses acquired from August 2009 to April 2015 fall by the wayside, that’s okay. The company “may” sell one or more of them, but that’s not the emphasis at this time.

3D Systems is beginning to “feel” like a different company, even though VJ arrived only about eight months ago. Given what he did in his 32 years at HP, I’m optimistic that he will get the company on track. He is an engineer and strong manager and has the respect of former colleagues. His focus on verticals is a good move, and its healthcare business is a great example of how the company could develop in other markets.

30 Years Later

December 4, 2016

Filed under: 3D printing,additive manufacturing,CAD/CAM/CAE,event,life — Terry Wohlers @ 11:02

It does not seem possible, but it’s true: Wohlers Associates has been in business for three decades. I started the company in November 1986 after working at Colorado State University for five years. I was young at the time—not even 30—but it “felt” like the right thing to do. I was inspired by Dr. Joel Orr, a brilliant individual and extremely successful consultant, author, and speaker. I told myself that if I could do even a small fraction of what he does, it would be incredibly interesting and challenging. I don’t know that I’ve even “scratched the surface,” compared to what Joel has achieved, but it has been enormously gratifying, and I’ve been lucky to work with great people and organizations over the years.

The original focus of Wohlers Associates was on CAD tools and their application. I was presented with the opportunity of being the instructor of the first semester credit course on CAD at CSU in 1983. CAD experience and know-how were hard to find back then, so I was approached by three publishers to write a textbook. I accepted the offer from McGraw-Hill in 1985. The work experience and textbook provided a foundation for offering CAD instruction and consulting to local companies, such as HP, Kodak, Waterpik, and Woodward. I also accepted writing assignments from technical journals, which did not pay a lot, but they helped to introduce our startup company to the world. I learned from Joel that if you want to meet people with similar interests, speak at industry events, so I began to participate in technical conference programs.

30-years

Less than a year after starting the company, I came across a short but interesting article in a newsletter published by Joel. It was about a start-up company named 3D Systems, and it discussed a new process called stereolithography. I was fascinated by the concept and envisioned how powerful it could become in combination with CAD solid modeling tools, which were rolling out at around that time. Aries Concept Station was the first to support stereolithography. Dave Albert, a person that Joel and I know, was commissioned to create the CAD interface and file format for 3D Systems. It was called “STL” and it’s still being used extensively today. I don’t know whether Joel knows it, but I credit him for introducing me to additive manufacturing and 3D printing, a class of technology in which our company has spent most of its energy. I’m excited to go to work every day because of the almost endless opportunities that this technology presents.

I have many stories from the journey that began 30 years ago, but I will save most of them for another time. I do want to say that without my wife, Diane, the company would not exist. She has provided mountains of loving support and encouragement over the years. Also, she has graciously tolerated my crazy travel and work schedule. Without her, our accounting system would be a mess. I also give my sincerest gratitude to Joel Orr. Without his inspiration and encouragement, it’s safe to say that Wohlers Associates would not have been launched. Thanks also to countless others around the world for contributing and supporting our company over the past 30 years.

Metals at formnext

November 20, 2016

Filed under: 3D printing,additive manufacturing,event — Terry Wohlers @ 16:03

I attended last week’s formnext, powered by TCT, in Frankfurt, Germany. The four-day event, involving an international exhibition and conference, was outstanding, especially given that it was the second year. Most major companies in additive manufacturing and 3D printing were present, and many had very large and impressive exhibits. One could easily make the case that it was the most elaborate and striking display of AM products and services ever.

As with most events, the people in attendance were as important as anything else. Organizations around the world sent their best and most informed employees. This is especially important for visitors wanting to schedule meetings and have discussions about AM and where it is headed. If the schedules of others were anything like mine—and I’m sure many were—they had little spare time through the week because of all that formnext had to offer.

engine-block2

If the event had a theme, it was metal AM. Additive Industries, Arcam, Concept Laser, EOS, ReaLizer, Renishaw, 3D Systems, and SLM Solutions had large displays with machines and parts. Companies relatively new to metal AM that showed their machines were AddUp (a collaboration between Michelin and Fives), Farsoon, OR Laser, Sentrol, and Sisma. Fraunhofer ILT displayed a small and relatively low-cost metal AM machine that may be commercialized at some point.

Some of the mature companies showed automated metal powder removal and handling capabilities and concepts. As their customers ramp up for production quantities, this automation will become important. Absent was the automation of most other downstream operations, such as thermal stress relief (with the exception of Additive Industries), hot isostatic pressing, and the removal of parts from the build plate. Also absent was automating the removal of supports/anchors from the parts, CNC machining, and surface treatment.

Regardless of your interest in AM, formnext had something for everyone and was the place to be last week. One exhibition hall included a large and impressive concentration of technology and know-how. It was completely filled, so Messe Frankfurt and TCT employees are planning to expand into a second hall for the 2017 event, which is set for November 14-17. The four days of conference sessions were also very good and well attended. I only wish I could have attended more of them. Maybe next year.

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