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Bangalore

October 5, 2019

Filed under: 3D printing,additive manufacturing,review,travel — Terry Wohlers @ 16:25

I visited Bangalore, India for the first time last week and the experience could not have been better. The people were extremely friendly, with many approaching me and speaking as if we had met before, although we hadn’t. I was lucky enough to spend time at interesting and successful companies, including 3D Product Development, Intech DMLS, and Supercraft3D. All three are vibrant, focused on additive manufacturing products and services, and at the forefront of AM in India.

I got two very different views of the city. A surprising number of large and notable companies that you may know little or nothing about operate out of Bangalore. Examples are HCL ($8.6 billion in annual sales), Infosys ($12.1 billion), Tata Consultancy Services ($20.9 billion), and Wipro ($8.5 billion). HCL became the first Indian IT company to reach market capitalization of $100 billion. These and other companies offer design and engineering services, and a few, such as Wipro, have a growing AM services business. These companies and their work and people are impressive.

The view of these giant and successful companies was conflicting when compared to much of the rest of Bangalore. The narrow streets were constantly clogged with cars, scooters, cycles, and motorized rickshaws. Traveling a distance that should take minutes took an hour or longer. Many of the sidewalks and curbs were crumbling and lined with coils of wire and other debris. The city is in desperate need of infrastructure improvement and updating. I was told the streets were not designed to handle such growth over the years, and trying to fix them now is next to impossible. Funding for a mass transit system would be outrageously expensive and is unlikely, according to those I spoke with.

Bangalore is an intriguing place to visit and I’m glad I did. It was a privilege to participate in the 11th NASSCOM Design & Engineering Summit, which was the primary reason for the trip. Visits to the Bangalore Palace, the State Legislature building, the city’s oldest and best known bazaar shopping district, and two microbreweries made the trip even more interesting. The food was incredibly flavorful and outstanding. Best of all, I spent quality time with a couple friends from India and met many new ones that I hope will develop into lasting relationships. Bangalore offers differing views of itself, yet I look forward to the possibility of returning.

Martin and Short

July 15, 2019

Filed under: entertainment,event,review — Terry Wohlers @ 18:00

Steve Martin and Martin Short were in northern Colorado on Friday for a two-hour show filled with comedy and music. Martin and Short are among my favorite comedians. They have been in many movies and television programs such as the Three Amigos and Saturday Night Live. Martin also starred in Father of the Bride, The Jerk, Planes, Trains, and Automobiles, Parenthood, The Pink Panther, and many others.

The evening began with clips from classic movies and SNL skits to warm up the audience at Budweiser Event Center near Loveland. Martin and Short then appeared to a warm applause and launched into hilarious stories about friends, family, celebrities, and themselves. Throughout the evening, the two took many friendly jabs at one another. They had the audience laughing and in tears. I’m glad my wife and I, along with friends, attended the show.

In the coming weeks and months, Martin, 73, and Short, 69, will perform in other parts of the U.S., as well as in Canada and New Zealand. If you like good, live comedy from two of the very best, book an evening with them. You won’t regret it.

Lee Kuan Yew

June 4, 2019

Filed under: future,life,review — Terry Wohlers @ 16:15

I recently finished a book titled Lee Kuan Yew: The Grand Master’s Insights on China, the United States, and the World. Lee Kuan Yew, commonly referred to as LKY, was the first Prime Minister of Singapore and served in this capacity for three decades. I am unaware of another person with such clarity of understanding in so many parts of the world. His knowledge and insight are extraordinary.

In easy to understand language, LKY drilled down deeply into the past, present, and future of China, India, the U.S., and other parts of the world. His wide-ranging discussions included geopolitical, social, economic, healthcare, education, and religion. He even discussed how a dominant language in a given country, such as China, will impact its future.

The book is written in question/answer format, which is a little unusual. The content, however, made up for it. Amazon customer reviews—103 total—gave it 4.9 out of 5 stars. I recommend it highly.

Favorite Products of 2018

December 29, 2018

Filed under: life,review — Terry Wohlers @ 19:09

Nearly every year at this time, I look back at the products I purchased and like the most. The following is a summary.

Data projector ($350): Buying a data projector is not as easy as one would expect. The first one we purchased was said to have 2,500 lumens, but it was anything but bright. We returned it in favor of a ViewSonic projector with 3,600 lumens. It’s a great product, especially for the relatively low price.

Projector screen ($97): This 16:9, 254-cm (100-inch) screen is exceptional. It’s easy to transport, stand up, and take down. It comes with a carrying case that makes it even better.

Travel brief ($379): This is my second ballistic nylon laptop brief from Tumi. My first one is still like new and our son is now using it.

Stackable wine rack ($32): We liked the first one so much, we bought two more. Each bamboo rack stores 18 bottles.

Snow skis ($748): The Soul 7 HD skis from Rossignol are superb. They are not inexpensive, but they’re worth every penny.

Ear protection ($20): If you attend concerts or other events where sound can be excessive, consider this ear protection filter product from Westone. My wife and I each got a pair for the recent Eagles, Zac Brown, and Doobie Brothers concert.

Small USB fan ($14): Whether you’re working or relaxing in an area that’s a bit warm, consider this little gem from Opolar. The five-inch, USB-powered fan is well designed, offers two speeds, and is quiet.

 

Footwear from Wiivv

September 9, 2018

Filed under: 3D printing,additive manufacturing,review — Terry Wohlers @ 08:38

The idea of 3D-printed footwear is appealing. The technology makes it possible to affordably print custom parts that make up the product. Recent history shows that customers are willing to pay a premium for products that have been designed specifically for them. I have many personalized, 3D-printed products, and they are of more value to me than other products. What’s more, I will never get rid of any of them, which is something I cannot say about most other products.

Recently, I received personalized insoles and sandals from Wiivv, a young company that has already shipped more than 50,000 pairs of custom products. The insoles, shown in the following (left), includes a custom, gray part made in nylon by powder bed fusion. I have dedicated them to my dress shoes that I wear at formal events. In fact, I wore them Friday night at a wedding and walked and stood on them for hours without sitting and my feet felt good the entire evening.

For about three weeks, I have been wearing sandals from Wiivv in the office. I have a sit-stand workstation and stand about 70-80% of each day. The sandals took 2–3 days to break in, especially in the area of the arch. In the middle and right images, notice the gray, custom 3D-printed part, along with the arch pocket into which the part is inserted. Both arches felt overly firm in the beginning, but are now comfortable. The straps lock into the sole and can be adjusted for fit and comfort.

When ordering insoles or sandals from Wiivv, a special phone app is used that steps you through the process. It was easy and took no longer than about 15 minutes total. The app prompts you to stand against a wall on a white, 8.5 x 11-inch sheet of paper, and asks you to shoot images from various angles. The company could not have made the measuring and ordering process much easier.

The look and feel of the materials and workmanship of the Wiivv products are of high quality. It’s too soon to know how long they will last, but I have no reason to believe they will not hold up for years. The price of custom, full-length insoles is $99, while custom sandals are $129, both of which are reasonable, in my view. I recommend them highly.

Important Events in AM

April 22, 2018

Last week, I attended the 20th Annual FIRPA Conference in Espoo, Finland, which is about 20 km (12 miles) from Helsinki. The event included some excellent presentations, including one from Jonas Eriksson of Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB. Eriksson discussed the production of parts by additive manufacturing for land-based gas turbine engines. To date, the company has redesigned many parts for metal AM and used the technology to produce more than 1,000 burner tips. The use of AM has resulted in a time reduction from 26 weeks to just three. As many as 60 people are now focused on AM at the company, with a goal of making metal AM as simple as 2D printing on paper.

Another very interesting presentation was given by Jyrki Saarinen of the University of Eastern Finland. His group worked closely with Dutch company Luxexcel to produce an AM machine with 1,000 inkjet nozzles for the printing of optical lenses in PMMA. The surface finish of the printed lenses is <2 nm RMS (less than 2 billionths of a meter), so no post-processing is required. The machine is capable of producing 40 lenses per hour, each measuring 10 mm in diameter x 2.5 mm in height, so the process is relatively fast.

I also had the privilege of visiting two world-class companies in Finland. The first was KONE, an $11 billion manufacturer of elevators, escalators, exterior revolving doors, and security entrances for commercial buildings. The company and its products are impressive. I also visited UPM, a $12.3 billion company with a strong position in paper, pulp, plywood, composites, and bio products. The company recently entered the AM industry by introducing a material extrusion filament product consisting of cellulose fiber and PLA.

Last week’s trip to Finland could not have gone better, thanks to the fine people that organized the meetings and very successful 20th annual conference. This week, the focus is on RAPID + TCT 2018, which begins tomorrow and goes through Thursday in Fort Worth, Texas. This event marks the 26th annual conference and exposition, and I’m proud to say that I have not missed a single one of them. Attendance has grown by ~2.3 times over the past four years and exhibit space has grown by ~4.5 times over the same period. If you are interested in attending one of the very best events in all things additive manufacturing, 3D printing, and 3D scanning, go to Fort Worth this week. You will not regret it.

Best Products of 2017

December 30, 2017

Filed under: entertainment,review — Terry Wohlers @ 09:13

The following are some of the best products and services I encountered over the past 12 months.

Samsung Galaxy S8 – I upgraded to this phone in July after owning two HTC Android phones. Both were very good, but the S8 is even better. I especially like Wi-Fi calling, recently branded as Calling Plus on the S8. With a wireless signal, it permits you to seamlessly make and receive calls anywhere in the world at no cost. One click turns it on and then you’re good to go. I like the phone’s performance, curved screen, water-resistance, and hot-spot feature.

HP DeskJet 3755 – For just $60, you can purchase the world’s smallest all-in-one document printer. It works especially well in small areas or if you have a second place, such as a cabin on a lake or condo in the mountains. I have not used it a lot, but when I have, it has worked flawlessly for scanning, copying, and printing.

Cambridge SoundWorks OontZ – For just $28, you can get this Bluetooth speaker. You are not going to get big sound in a large area, but it’s perfect for a relatively small space. Its design and battery life are very good.

Spotify – I’ve been using it for a few years, but decided to finally recognize it for how good it really is. Previously, I used it on an iPod that I’ve finally retired, and I’m now running it on my Samsung S8. It is free on a computer, but you’ll spend $10 monthly for using it on your phone.

Audible – It’s difficult to read a conventional book when you’re exercising, driving, or resting your eyes. With Audible, you can easily get through a good book while doing something else. The monthly subscription is $15 or you can pay as you go in the range of $15-25 per book.

Two Nights at a Kibbutz

December 17, 2017

Filed under: life,review,travel — Terry Wohlers @ 18:45

I returned from my eighth trip to Israel last week. The country is intensely interesting and thriving with many new infrastructure investments. Nearly everything about the country is fascinating, and I wish I had added another day or two with each visit. The Israeli people are highly educated, speak flawless English, and are up-to-date on world events and American politics. The amount of history in every corner of the country is staggering.

When visiting Israel the first time in March 1993, long-time friend Dave Tait, then with Laserform, and I were introduced to the concept of the kibbutz. A kibbutz is a type of community that originated in 1909 and initially focused on agriculture. The communal lifestyle has changed over the years and sources of income have expanded into the production of many types of products. I had always wanted to visit a kibbutz to see, up close, what life on one was like. More than 24 years later, the opportunity emerged.

Thanks to associate consultant Joseph Kowen, who lives in Zichron Ya’akov, Israel, for booking a room for me at Kibbutz Dalia, located about 37 km (23 miles) southwest of Nazareth. Upon our arrival, Joseph and I immediately caught the aroma of herds of sheep and cattle, which were located adjacent to the 800 or so residents. Dalia was formed in 1939 and has since expanded into the manufacture of water metering products, as well as wine-making. It offers visitor lodging as an additional stream of revenue.

I found my time at the kibbutz interesting. The lodging is not high-end, but my room was clean and comfortable and the wireless Internet and breakfast were excellent. Also, the employees were very friendly and helpful. Coincidentally, the father of one of them is working in Estes Park, Colorado, which is about an hour from Fort Collins. I went for walks both mornings to get a good view of the lifestyle on a kibbutz. It looked and felt somewhat similar to a quiet neighborhood in a rural village in the U.S., but without a main street, shops, restaurants, and signs with advertisements.

The Israeli kibbutz is among a lengthy list of reasons why I find the country so interesting. The country’s beaches, orchards, valleys, and deserts are striking, and its history is extraordinary. High-tech start-up companies and the economy are thriving, and many major infrastructure developments, including a light rail system, have been completed recently or are under construction. Tel Aviv is lively with trendy restaurants and nightclubs, posh hotels, and a beautiful Promenade that runs along the Mediterranean Sea. I’m already looking forward to my next visit.

How I Built This

November 4, 2017

Filed under: entertainment,life,review — Terry Wohlers @ 08:22

NPR’s “How I Built This” series of podcasts are excellent. They are candid interviews with the founders and CEOs of some of the top companies in the world. Among them: Jake Carpenter (Burton Snowboards), Perry Chen (Kickstarter), Jim Koch (Samuel Adams), and Herf Kelleher (Southwest Airlines). Others are Mark Cuban (serial entrepreneur), Richard Branson (Virgin), and John Mackey (Whole Foods Market).

To listen to the podcasts, go to the NPR website, review the titles and descriptions, and download the MP3 files. I have downloaded 16 thus far, copied them to my phone, and listened to 12 of them. Most are 40-50 minutes in length. Thanks to John Dulchinos of Jabil for telling me about them.

Most of the people being interviewed had humble beginnings, with little financial resources. They believed strongly in what they were doing and had extraordinary determination. One podcast details how Jim Koch and his 23-year old former secretary sold their first beer and was voted the best in America just six weeks after it became available. Another is an interview with Maureen and Tony Wheeler and how they started Lonely Planet, the largest publisher of travel guide books.

The podcasts provide fascinating insight into how some of the most recognizable brands were established. They are easy listening, inspiring, and entertaining. Thanks to NPR for making them available free of charge.

Vestas Wind Turbines

October 20, 2017

Filed under: manufacturing,review — Terry Wohlers @ 07:49

Have you ever wondered how wind turbine blades are made? I have. Luckily, I was a part of a special tour initiated by SME Chapter 354 that gave a good view into the manufacturing process. I was one of 27 that toured the Vestas blade factory in Windsor, Colorado earlier this week. The blades produced at the impressive facility are 54 meters (178 feet) in length, weigh seven tons, and amazingly complex. When a blade is at work, the speed at its tip is an astounding 251 kph (156 mph).

Denmark-based Vestas began to make wind turbines in 1979 and leads in the production and worldwide sales, with more than 16% of the market. GE, Siemens, and many relatively small companies are also in the business. Vestas has factories in Denmark, Germany, Italy, Spain, China, India, and Colorado. The Windsor and Brighton, Colorado factories produce a significant number of all blades from the company. Windsor, alone, produces about 2,000 annually.

The visit began with an excellent presentation by Hans Jespersen, vice president and general manager of the Vestas blade factory in Windsor. Six other employees were on hand to answer questions and serve as our tour guides. Molds used to produce the blades are the largest—and definitely the longest—I have seen in 30+ years of visiting manufacturing facilities worldwide. The molds are made of a composite material, and the blades, themselves, are made predominantly of fiberglass and epoxy. On the surface, it may sound relatively straightforward, but sophisticated methods, intellectual property, and decades of experience go into the production of the blades.

Thanks to SME Chapter 354 for setting up the tour, and special thanks to the people at Vestas for sharing their time and expertise. Our tour guide, Phil McCarthy, senior production manager at the company, did an outstanding job in showing and explaining the many manufacturing steps and processes at the company. The tour was among the best I have taken in recent years. Vestas rolled out the “red carpet,” spent a lot of time with us, and answered many questions. I now have an even greater appreciation for wind turbines and their contribution to clean energy.

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