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Ireland

June 19, 2017

Filed under: life,review,travel — Terry Wohlers @ 00:59

Note: The following was authored by Ian Campbell, associate consultant at Wohlers Associates.

Having been born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, I thought I knew a lot about all things Irish. However, having joined Terry and Diane Wohlers on a trip to the southwest of Ireland this week, I have learned a lot more. Ireland is sometimes called “the Emerald Isle,” and here in County Kerry, the landscape is so incredibly green. There is an Irish song named “Forty Shades of Green” and I am sure we have seen most of them.

There is, of course, good reason for all the beautiful green vegetation. It rains. We met a waiter who told us that from October through March, it rained every day. Every single day! Amazingly, we are enjoying day after day of blues skies, bright sunshine, and near perfect temperatures. Today is our fourth day of it. The locals say we must have the luck of the Irish. The contrast between blue sky and green landscape makes everything even more spectacular.

It is sometimes said that America and Britain are two countries divided by a common language. Here in Kerry, they may write in English but we are not sure if they are speaking it. I can nearly manage to understand the local dialect, but Terry and Diane often look bemused. However, the Irish are so friendly and helpful, and they work hard to make visitors feel welcome. They are also very proud of their country’s history, from medieval walls dating back over 900 years, to a parade of 300 vintage cars and tractors, celebrating the 100-year anniversary of Henry Ford setting up a factory in Cork, Ireland, where we spent the first nearly 24 hours.

Perhaps the most interesting (or frightening) experience we have had was kissing the Blarney Stone at Blarney Castle. It involved climbing more than 100 steps and hanging over backwards from the castle parapet to kiss a stone that supposedly endows the “gift of the gab,” that is, the ability to speak with eloquence. I am not sure Terry really needed to do this as he is already an eloquent speaker. However, we all had a go and survived the experience.

Another Irish song asks “Have you ever been across the sea to Ireland?” We now have, and I would encourage everyone to do likewise. It’s a fascinating country with brilliant green landscape and an intriguing history.

Best Products of 2016

January 1, 2017

Filed under: review — Terry Wohlers @ 17:24

At this time nearly every year, I like to highlight some of the best products of the year. The following are those that stand out and deserve special recognition.

Jeep Grand Cherokee – We purchased the 2016 75th Anniversary Edition in May, which includes some special features, such as bronze wheels and trim. I like everything associated with this product, and it may be one of the best vehicles we have owned. It now has fewer than 6,435 km (4,000 miles) on it, so it’s probably too soon to draw a final conclusion. The safety features, adaptive cruise control, eight-speed transmission, and overall drivability and comfort make it a great product.

jeep

Logitech HD Pro Webcam C920 – I paid $63 for this excellent device. It rests nicely at the top of my monitor and shoots high-quality 1080p video for saving or use with Skype or other types of broadcasts.

CamelBak Rogue Hydration Pack – This is my first CamelBak product and I like it a lot. I bought it for mountain biking and it’s perfect for half-day trips. It’s a good value at $44.

Black+Decker LST300 Trimmer/Edger – For $63, this battery-powered product is excellent for edging your lawn along the driveway and sidewalk.

Graco Secure Coverage Digital Baby Monitor – If you want to know whether your child or grandchild is awake, it’s a bargain at just $35.

With the exception of the Jeep Grand Cherokee, we purchased all of these products from Amazon. The company’s Prime service is excellent.

Best wishes to you for a great 2017. Happy New Year!

South Africa

November 6, 2016

Filed under: 3D printing,additive manufacturing,manufacturing,review — Terry Wohlers @ 14:10

I spent last week in Vanderbijlpark, South Africa, at RAPDASA 2016. It was the 17th annual conference and exhibition of the Rapid Product Development Association of South Africa. I’ve been lucky enough to attend all 17 of them. Like fine wine, the event continues to improve with age, and this one was the best, thanks to organizer and host Vaal University of Technology. VUT’s Science and Technology Park, the venue for the event, completes more than 1,000 industrial projects annually with machines and facilities that rival the very best in the world.

On Monday, a few of us visited a company that VUT is working with it. The company produces cast impellers for large industrial compressors. VUT is using Voxeljet additive manufacturing technology to produce sand molds and cores for the impellers. It is not yet into production with the process, but it is expected to cut the cost in half, saving R2 million ($147,000) per casting. What’s more, the delivery will improve dramatically from an excruciating 9-12 months to just one month. The impellers spin at 3,000 rpm and operate in a harsh environment. Company management is ecstatic about what the technology will do for it.

cast-impellers

Much of South Africa’s work began many years ago at the Centre for Rapid Prototyping and Manufacturing (CRPM) at Central University of Technology. Today, CRPM is extremely active, with more than 600 commercial projects annually. The group is running a wide range of industrial machines, including several metal AM systems that are at work building high-end parts used in an array of industries. One area of focus is around medical devices and implants. Earlier this year, CRPM received ISO certification, which shows that the people, processes, and work at CUT are among the best you’ll find anywhere.

A platinum project was launched recently with Lonmin, one of the world’s largest producers of the precious metal. I had the privilege of meeting and having dinner with several managers from the company. The effort is serious, although early in its development. The largest market for platinum, by far, is catalytic converters, followed by jewelry as a distant second. Time will tell whether the company can use AM to create entirely new markets for this special material, but it looks like the people are going into it with a lot of enthusiasm and determination.

What do these and other developments in South Africa have in common? Professor Deon de Beer. He began his work in AM at CUT where he helped launch the CRPM. He then went to VUT to establish the Science and Technology Park, which is mostly focused on AM. He’s now at North-West University, but has continued strong ties with CUT and VUT. His humble and somewhat quiet demeanor will fool you because he’s like a spark plug. He ignites an avalanche of activity wherever he goes and brings out the very best of people that surrounds him. Without Deon and his inspiration, AM progress would be VERY different in the country.

South Africa is home to many Idea 2 Product (I2P) labs, with more than 25 operating worldwide. They consist of facilities full of equipment for hands-on learning of CAD, 3D printing, and other design and manufacturing technology. The I2P labs were also a brainchild of Deon de Beer. With him and a growing number of colleagues and others, South Africa has grown to become a leader in additive manufacturing. The adoption of the technology is not as deep and widespread as it is in the U.S. and parts of Europe, but the work is just as advanced and impressive. I credit de Beer and the formation of RAPDASA (both the association and annual event) for the on-going ideas, programs, strategy, and education that are provided country-wide.

RØDE Microphones

August 15, 2016

Two of our consultants and I have had the privilege of visiting RØDE Microphones of Sydney, Australia. RØDE is a manufacturer of world-class microphone products for studio recording, performances, video broadcasts, and live interviews. It also manufactures microphones for presenters (lavalier and button mics) and smart phones. Over the past nearly two years, we have worked with RØDE and learned a great deal about the company and its products. Peter Freedman, managing director and chief executive, has given permission to disclose and discuss our relationship publicly.

RØDE hires some of the best people in Australia and other parts of the world. The company has offices in Seattle, Los Angeles, New York, and Hong Kong. Most of the Australian employees we’ve met are young, bright, and energetic. Freedman is the driver of new products, is constantly pushing the limits, and is the heart and soul of the company. RØDE is running $30 million in precision equipment, including a considerable number of new machines that were installed since we’ve started working together. Freedman seeks to be among the best of the best in the design and manufacturing of microphones. And, it shows by the company’s strong growth in recent years.

rode

I feel lucky to be able to work with great companies such as RØDE and people like Freedman and his team. He always has a can-do attitude and is constantly looking for new and better ways for product development and manufacturing. Over our 29 years in business, I have worked with a few people and organizations that find reasons why you cannot do something and serve as obstacles to progress. Fortunately, most of the people that we’ve encountered have the right spirit and outlook. Engineering consultant, futurist, and friend Joel Orr once said, “Success breeds success.” I could not agree more, and RØDE is a company that is producing a lot of it.

GE’s New AM Center

August 1, 2016

Filed under: 3D printing,additive manufacturing,manufacturing,review — Terry Wohlers @ 09:45

In April 2016, GE opened its new Center for Additive Technology Advancement (CATA), located near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The 11,613-sq meter (125,000-sq ft) facility was designed to drive innovation and adoption of additive manufacturing across the company’s major businesses. They include Aviation, Energy Connections, Healthcare, Oil & Gas, Power, Renewable Energy, Transportation, and Current, powered by GE. CATA houses multiple AM machines from EOS, SLM Solutions, Stratasys, and ExOne. They are complimented by many CNC machining centers, EDM, heat treatment chambers, and other equipment. Space is available that would essentially double the number of machines and processes at the facility.

I toured CATA last Thursday and found it to be jaw-dropping impressive. It will almost guarantee an acceleration of knowledge and understanding of AM for production applications within the company. Having spent time with GE employees from several businesses over the years, I can say without reservation that many have solid AM experience. Even so, company management would be first to admit that the opportunity to grow and expand expertise across the 305,000-employee corporation is vast. CATA will help the company get there more quickly. Work at the facility is focused on mid technology readiness levels (i.e., TRL 4-7).

cata

GE advanced its position in AM when it acquired Morris Technologies, and its sister company, Rapid Quality Manufacturing, in November 2012. Greg Morris, then CEO and owner of the company, is the leader of Additive Technologies at GE Aviation. In 2013, GE Aviation announced that it had developed a 3D-printed fuel nozzle for its new LEAP engine. The attention received by the nozzle, which is now in production, has been an inspiration to countless organizations worldwide. Airbus was the first to receive LEAP engines, each with 19 nozzles, in April 2016 for the A320neo aircraft.

GE is making a big investment in additive manufacturing. However, it has shown few new designs since the public announcement of the fuel nozzle program. In my view, it is time for the company to show another advanced and exciting design for AM to serve as further inspiration inside and outside the company. It would make a bold statement and show the company’s leadership in the adoption and advancement of AM technology.

CATA is located about an hour from America Makes, which is the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute in Youngstown, Ohio. Other key organizations close to CATA are Alcoa, ATI, Carpenter Technology, ExOne, Lincoln Electric, and the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining. Universities include Carnegie Mellon, Case Western Reserve, Pennsylvania State, University of Pittsburgh, and Youngstown State. These organizations were a factor in choosing the location for CATA, a $40-million facility that signals how important AM has become at GE. The world-class facility will likely serve as a model for other large corporations globally.

Dear Leader

July 17, 2016

Filed under: life,review — Terry Wohlers @ 16:06

Dear Leader: My Escape from North Korea by Jang Jin-sung takes you on an incredible journey. In this international bestselling book, Jang detailed what he and a friend encountered to reach China from North Korea. Eventually, he made it to South Korea where he lives today. Along the way, he discussed the horrible conditions in North Korea and the nauseating behavior of three generations of the Kim dynasty, spanning from 1948 to current leader Kim Jong-un.

dear-leader

Author Jang Jin-sung served as a North Korean State Poet Laureate, an elite position that permitted face-to-face interaction with Kim Jong-il (Kim Jong-un’s father and previous leader). Kim’s extravagant and repulsive lifestyle, told by Jang Jin-sung, is intriguing and sad. The escape involved remarkable encounters with North Korean and Chinese authorities, hunger, and bitter cold conditions, sometimes with little shelter.

The book is excellent and I recommend it highly. Not only does it grasp your attention, it provides astonishing insight into the North Korean government and everyday life in the country. Jang Jin-sung provides a sliver of hope for the country’s future as a small but growing number of North Koreans learn about life in other parts of the world.

Lundeen Sculpture

June 5, 2016

Filed under: 3D printing,additive manufacturing,review — Terry Wohlers @ 15:20

I had the pleasure of visiting Lundeen Sculpture in Loveland, Colorado, last week. The company produces world-class sculptures of about everything imaginable. The “sweet spot” at the company is the recreation of people and animals with spectacular precision and realism. The sculpting is done mostly by the Lundeen family, including Bets, George, Mark, their cousin Ann LaRose, and Joey Bainer, an unrelated sculptor. I first met Nelse Lundeen a few years ago. He handles accounting and other business issues at the company.

George Lundeen founded the company in the mid 1970s and was our host, along with Nelse. (My wife and two friends joined me on the tour.) George showed us many beautifully-crafted bronze versions of famous people, such as astronaut Jack Swigert, which is on display at Denver International Airport, and Dan Marino, a former Miami Dolphins quarterback that was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2005. The Marino sculpture is on display at the Dolphins stadium in Miami.

George told an amusing story of his daughter, a big Marino fan. George asked her to visit the company after school, but did not tell her that Marino was present. When she arrived, Marino walked around the corner to her astonishment and addressed her by name. I can’t imagine how big of a surprise it was to her.

lundeen

The company is working on a two-year project involving the creation of the Stations of the Cross, which depicts Jesus Christ and others on the day of his crucifixion. Each station involves incredibly detailed clay sculptures that end up being larger-than-life bronze works of art. The effort is being sponsored by billionaire Joe Ricketts, founder and former chairman and CEO of TD Ameritrade, a large discount brokerage located in Omaha, Nebraska. He is building a Christian retreat center named The Cloisters on the Platte on 930 acres near Omaha. (The Platte is a major river running through the state.) The retreat will include the bronze Stations of the Cross.

George showed us the many clay sculptures that are underway for the Stations of the Cross project. Each are being 3D scanned, scaled up, and 3D-printed using a machine from Voxeljet. He explained that the process of scanning and printing is saving a dramatic amount of time. The 3D-printed patterns are shipped to the Lundeen team for inspection and light work and then delivered to a Loveland foundry for investment casting. The bronze castings are then  assembled, welded, and finished into their final form. George allowed me to take many pictures, but asked that I not put them on the Internet. A good video, co-produced by Analise Lundeen, shows much of the work and is found here.

SME’s RAPID 2016

May 21, 2016

I attended this week’s RAPID 2016 in Orlando, Florida. As usual, the conference and exposition were excellent. An estimated 5,190 attended the event, compared to 4,512 last year. Exhibit space increased to 4,153 sq meters (44,700 sq ft), up from 2,903 sq meters (31,250 sq ft) last year. The following are a few highlights of the event:

● HP introduced and showed its Jet Fusion 3200 and 4200 3D printers for the first time publicly. The machines are capable of addressing 340 million voxels per second in thermoplastic materials, such as PA12. They are 10 times faster and operate at half the cost of competitive systems, according to HP. The systems are mostly open, which means they support third-party materials at competitive prices.

heart

● Renishaw showed its new RenAM 500M machine that produces metal parts. The engineering is impressive. Meanwhile, 3D Systems displayed its new ProX DMP 320 machine for producing metal parts. It is based on technology developed by Belgium-based LayerWise, which was acquired by 3D Systems in 2014.

● Xjet of Israel introduced its NanoParticle Jetting technology. It uses inkjet printing to produce parts in stainless steel and silver. The parts are small, but the feature detail is good.

● Event organizer SME hosted a fashion show that featured entirely new 3D-printed designs. Many were impressive. I have now attended five fashion shows that highlight 3D-printed products and it’s remarkable how far the designs have advanced in a few years.

fashion-show

Congrats to SME for another great event, which continues to improve year after year. With increasing applications of additive manufacturing and 3D printing for final part production, the event has the opportunity to grow much larger in the future.

RAPID 2017 will be held May 8-11 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Add it to your calendar and plan to attend.

NextEngine 3D Scanner

February 13, 2016

Filed under: CAD/CAM/CAE,review — Terry Wohlers @ 07:59

When NextEngine introduced its first 3D scanner at SolidWorks World 2006, it got my attention. The product is based on the company’s patented MultiStripe Laser Triangulation (MLT) technology. At the time, it was the lowest priced scanner of its kind. If my memory serves me correctly, the price of the new Ultra HD version is the same as it was back then (base price of $2,995), yet the scan quality is now far better.

The small Ultra HD unit is capable of 268,000 points per 6.5 sq cm (1 sq inch), which is very good for such a low-cost product. NextEngine publishes an accuracy of +/- 0.125 mm (0.005 inch), although it is capable of +/- 0.025 mm (0.001 inch) accuracy under optimal conditions, according to Dan Gustafson, director of marketing at the Santa Monica, California company. When running the scanner in “Optional Extended Range Mode,” which covers a scan envelope of 55.9 x 41.9 x 27.9 cm (22 x 16.5 x 11 inches), accuracy is +/- 1.14 mm (0.045 inch).

An interesting tool for comparing low-cost 3D scanning options is located here. Click each of the models near the bottom of the window and play around with them. When selecting one, it splits the window into quadrants, as shown in the following example, with each representing a different scanning solution. Click and drag the circle at the center to increase or decrease the size of the quadrants. Click the small circles near the bottom to create different views of the 3D model.

nextengine

The functionality built into the NextEngine website is one of the best and most effective I’ve seen for comparing products. My only suggestion would be to include at least one product that is priced similarly or higher than the Ultra HD scanner. Other than that, the people at NextEngine have nailed it. Congratulations to NextEngine for 10 years of commercializing low-cost 3D scanning products based on MLT technology.

Best Products of 2015

December 31, 2015

Filed under: review — Terry Wohlers @ 11:18

The following are among the best products that I purchased this year.

ExpressVPN – If you’re looking for a good VPN, consider this one. A VPN encrypts all of your Internet traffic, which is especially important when using public wireless services at hotels, airports, and coffee shops. If someone tries to tap into your communications while you’re using a VPN, they will not be able to detect your IP address or location. You could be sitting in Shanghai, but it’d show that you’re in another city and country. (More than 100 cities in 78 countries are available to choose from.) Use of the product is $8.32 per month with an annual subscription.

HTC One M9 Smartphone – I liked my previous HTC One smartphone, so I upgraded to the M9 version. The phone has a good battery life, a fast processor, and is the perfect size for me. One of the nicest features is Wi-Fi calling. If you have a wireless connection, you can make a call to or from anywhere in the world at no cost.

Bose SoundLink Bluetooth Speaker III – This $269 device is perfect for portable use, although we use it in one location. The product plays for up to 14 hours on one battery charge. It sounds great and works well.

bose

Salomon Q-98 Snow Skis – I bought these skis in January 2015 and I’m glad I did. They are 98 mm under foot and work well in deep powder, as well as on groomed surfaces. They turn very well on hard-packed snow—even better than my K2 Rictor skis, which are narrower and considered excellent for hard-surface turning. The Salomon STH 10 bindings that I bought for them are also good.

Honeywell Humidifier – If you live in a dry climate, humidity is important. I purchased Honeywell’s Model HEV312 for our property in Frisco, Colorado. It is located at 2,766 meters (9,075 feet) in the Rocky Mountains where the air is especially dry in the winter. The product has a small footprint, is quiet, and offers many settings. Most importantly, it really kicks out the moisture.

2015 was a great year and I expect 2016 to be even better. Best wishes to you for a safe and prosperous New Year!

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