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Alan Parsons

June 3, 2018

Filed under: entertainment,event — Terry Wohlers @ 17:06

Note: Thanks to RØDE founder Peter Freedman and CEO Damien Wilson for connecting us with Alan Parsons. (Parsons uses world-class, award-winning microphones from RØDE. He will be gaining access to the latest 3D printing technology that RØDE and Wohlers Associates have been exploring. Some interesting new designs will be produced using an HP Jet Fusion machine, a system RØDE recently installed.)

If you grew up in the 1970s and like good rock ‘n roll music, you’re probably familiar with The Alan Parsons Project. Parsons is a musician, composer, record producer, and director. Among his band’s hits are Eye in the Sky, Games People Play, Sirius, and Time. My 31-song Spotify playlist includes music from the albums Tales of Mystery and Imagination, I Robot, Eye in the Sky, and others. I was introduced to Alan Parsons music in 1977 by good friend Gary James during our first year at the University of Nebraska at Kearney.

Parsons got his start at age 18 as an audio engineer at Abbey Road Studios in London. The 69-year-old Englishman engineered hit music with Paul McCartney, the Hollies, and Pink Floyd, including The Dark Side of the Moon. He was responsible for adding the brilliant saxophone part in Al Stewart’s Year of the Cat, which is a favorite. Last night’s concert at Levitt Pavilion in Denver, Colorado was the first in series of live performances this summer in the U.S, Mexico, Germany, and Poland. Alan Parsons is so incredibly talented and his band sounded fantastic.

My wife and good friends Bill and Stephanie Beyers were among a few people that spent time back stage with several of the band members. We talked with drummer Danny Thompson and guitarist Dan Tracey and Jeff Kollman, but spent the most time with keyboardist and Grammy Award winner Tom Brooks. We discussed the 3D printing of musical products and described the way the technology works. Our conversation with Parsons himself was brief, but good.

Alan Parsons and other rock legends will not be around forever. We lost Tom Petty and Glenn Frey before I got to see them perform live. My fear is that as these people and bands disappear, new rock ‘n roll musicians will not fill the void. Try to name one current-day rock band with several hits. Maybe a millennial can do it, but I cannot. In the meantime, we need to remind ourselves to take in live performances of renowned bands of the ‘70s such as the one last night.